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Staff

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Director: Dr. Kristian Göransson
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Kristian Göransson is Director of the Swedish Institute since 1 July 2013. He was educated at Lund University where he read Classics, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History. In 2007 he completed his doctorate on The Transport Amphorae from Euesperides. The Maritime Trade of a Cyrenaican City 400–250 BC at Lund University. As a classical archaeologist he has participated in excavations in Rome, Sicily, Greece, Libya and Jordan. Before coming to Rome he was Curator at the Medelhavsmuseet (The Museum of Mediterranean and Near Eastern Antiquities) in Stockholm between 2007 and 2013. His research interests include ancient North Africa and Sicily and ancient economy and trade.

Deputy Director (from autumn 2019): PhD Maria Oen
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Research Assistant: Dr. Fredrik Tobin
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Fredrik Tobin is an archaeologist with field experience from Italy (San Giovenale, Poggio Civitate, Monte Polizzo, and Vulci), Cyprus (Makounta-Voules),Turkey (Labraunda) and Israel (Tel Megiddo). He received his PhD in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History from Uppsala University in 2015. His doctoral dissertation was a study of the Etruscan chamber tombs at San Giovenale. Through the field project that he directed at the site from 2011 to 2015, over 200 new tombs were documented. His primary area of research is Roman and Etruscan architecture, but he has also published on terracottas, ancient music, and the history of archaeology. At the Swedish Institute in Rome he teaches the archaeology and history of both Roman and pre-Roman Italy.

Administration

Stefania Renzetti
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Linda Linqvist
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Library
Astrid Capoferro
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Federica Lucci
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Secretary: Fanny Lind
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Webmaster: Stefania Renzetti


Office in Stockholm
Skeppargatan 8 - 4tr. - 114 52 Stockholm
Tel. +46-08-6621940, fax +46-08-6653133
Ingrid Willstrand, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Seminars at the Institute

Seminar 2019: II
Tuesday 22 January 17.00

Gaius SternUniversity of California at Berkeley (retired)
Correcting the Reconstruction and Some Interpretations of the Ara Pacis

Modern students and scholars sometimes forget the Ara Pacis looked somewhat different in the year 1 than it does today.  Despite his best efforts, Giuseppe Moretti, building upon the work of Eugen Petersen, was able to reconstruct only an approximation of the Ara Pacis, unveiled to the public on 30 January 9 BC.  Missing material made it impossible to fill in certain gaps, and in a few places, Moretti deliberately or accidentally hid the loss of characters with an illusion of completion.  The combination of the missing pieces and the slightly flawed reconstruction have misled scholars, whose interpretations, in turn, deviated from the Roman vision of a New Golden Age, especially if they imagined they were looking at a perfect reconstruction of a great piece of imperial propaganda.  The result resembles a performance of a bad translation of a Shakespeare play.  The elegance of a great work of art is partly lost.   However, it is possible to correct some of these approximations and thereby get closer to the Augustan (and Senatorial) vision for the future, even though that future never took place as planned, for the death of Agrippa upended the stability of the regime and set in motion more than one crisis.

WELCOME!

 

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