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Fellows and Scholars 2018-2019

The Swedish Institute's Fellowships

Archaelogy:  Danilo Marco Campanaro, University of Lund, (january-june 2019): Illumination matters: telling things of the past in a new light.

Philolology, Aske Damtoft Poulsen, University of Lund (september 2018-january 2019): Peace and Power in the Roman Principate.

Philolology (Financed by the Association Friends of the Swedish Institute in Rome), Claudia Zich, University of Lund (september 2018-januari 2019): Use of Fiction in Plato and Thucydides.

Architecture, Fredrik Torisson (april-july 2019): Roma Termini Reframed (RTR).

Conservation, Jennie Sjöholm,  Umeå University,  (september 2018-january 2019): Heritagisation in built environments.

 

Fellowship "C.M. Lerici" Foundation

Archaeology,  Hampus Olsson, University of Lund (october 2018-march 2019): Ager Bleranus 450-50BC – Cultural change in a South Etruscan town and hinterland.

 

Fellow Marie Curie/ERC

Maria Oen: The Locus of Truth: Birgitta of Sweden and the Journey to Jerusalem & Ambivalent Images of Authorship(Part of Book Project, Sanctity and Female Authorship in the 14th Century and Beyond: Birgitta of Sweden & Catherine of Siena, eds. Maria H. Oen and Unn Falkeid

Seminars at the Institute

Seminar 2019: II
Tuesday 22 January 17.00

Gaius SternUniversity of California at Berkeley (retired)
Correcting the Reconstruction and Some Interpretations of the Ara Pacis

Modern students and scholars sometimes forget the Ara Pacis looked somewhat different in the year 1 than it does today.  Despite his best efforts, Giuseppe Moretti, building upon the work of Eugen Petersen, was able to reconstruct only an approximation of the Ara Pacis, unveiled to the public on 30 January 9 BC.  Missing material made it impossible to fill in certain gaps, and in a few places, Moretti deliberately or accidentally hid the loss of characters with an illusion of completion.  The combination of the missing pieces and the slightly flawed reconstruction have misled scholars, whose interpretations, in turn, deviated from the Roman vision of a New Golden Age, especially if they imagined they were looking at a perfect reconstruction of a great piece of imperial propaganda.  The result resembles a performance of a bad translation of a Shakespeare play.  The elegance of a great work of art is partly lost.   However, it is possible to correct some of these approximations and thereby get closer to the Augustan (and Senatorial) vision for the future, even though that future never took place as planned, for the death of Agrippa upended the stability of the regime and set in motion more than one crisis.

WELCOME!

 

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